Cooking With Conrad Gallagher – Butternut Ravioli with Sage Nut Brown Butter

Cooking With Conrad Gallagher – Butternut Ravioli with Sage Nut Brown Butter

Butternut Ravioli with Sage Nut Brown Butter

Roasting the squash brings out its sweetness in these ethereal made-from-scratch ravioli. A simple butter sauce lets the flavours of the filling shine, with a touch of nuttiness and crunch from toasted hazelnuts.

Ingredients:

The Dough:

Flour; More as Needed – 7 Oz. (1-1/3 Cup Plus 2 Tbs.)

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Flour) or Unbleached All-Purpose Flour – 1/4 cup plus 1 Tbs.

Large Egg Yolks – 6

Large Egg – 1

Extra-Virgin Olive Oil – 1 1/2 tsp

Kosher Salt – 1/4 tsp

 

The Filling:

Large Butternut Squash (About 2-1/2 Lb.), Halved Lengthwise & Seeded – 1

Unsalted Butter Softened – 3 Oz. (6 Tbs.)

Maldon Salt & Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Medium Cloves Garlic – 2

Finely Grated Grana Padano – 1 Oz. (1 cup)

For Cooking & Serving:

Maldon Salt

Unsalted Butter – 4 Oz. (1/2 cup)

Coarsley Chopped Toasted Hazelnuts, For Garnish

 

Method:

The Dough:

  1. Dump the flours on a work surface and mix to combine them. Make a deep, wide well in the center, making sure there is some flour on the bottom so the eggs are not directly on the surface. Add the egg yolks, whole egg, oil, and salt.
  2. Using a fork, beat the wet ingredients until combined, staying in the centre and being careful that the eggs don’t breach the wall. (If any does, gather it up and reinforce the wall.)
  3. Begin mixing in the flour from the inside of the wall, a little at a time, until the dough is too stiff to mix with the fork. Scrape the dough off the fork and continue mixing by hand, folding it and forming it into a single mass. If necessary, use a bench scraper to move the dough and to scrape any dried bits to the side.
  4. Lightly flour the work surface and knead the dough for at least 5 minutes, adding more flour if needed to keep the dough from sticking to your hands. Continue kneading until the dough is a smooth ball that feels soft like your earlobe. Wrap the dough loosely in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (Let it warm up a little before rolling, if necessary.)

 

Prepare The Filling:

  1. Position a rack in the centre of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Rub the inside of each seed cavity with 1 Tbs. butter, season well with salt and pepper, and put 2 sage leaves and a garlic clove in the center. Lay the squash cut side up on a sheet pan. Cook until the squash can be easily pierced with a fork, about 1 hour. Let cool to room temperature and discard the sage.
  3. Meanwhile, in a 10-inch skillet, heat the remaining 4 Tbs. butter over medium heat until browned and nutty, about 2 minutes.
  4. Scoop out all the flesh into a medium bowl and discard the skin. Mash together with the roasted garlic, cheese, and browned butter. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Roll The Dough:

  1. Set up a pasta machine on a large work surface. Set the machine to its widest setting.
  2. Flatten the dough with your hand or a rolling pin and divide it into pieces. (If you’re comfortable rolling dough, in half is fine; otherwise divide it into 3 or 4 pieces to get shorter sheets.)
  3. Working with one piece at a time and keeping the other pieces wrapped in plastic or cloth, run the dough through the widest setting on the machine a couple of times, flouring as needed, to work the dough.
  4. Move the rollers to the next setting and pass the dough through. Continue notching down by one setting and passing the dough through each time. Stop rolling when you can see the outline of your hand through the dough; this may not be the thinnest setting on some machines.
  5. Cut the sheet crosswise into 2-foot lengths to make them easier to work with and trim the long sides to make neat rectangles. (If you need to stack them, very lightly flour them.) Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel. Repeat with the remaining pieces of pasta.

 

Make The Ravioli:

  1. Lightly flour a rimmed baking sheet or tray.
  2. Working with one pasta sheet at a time, very lightly moisten the entire strip with water using a spray bottle or a pastry brush.
  3. Spoon rounded teaspoonfuls of the filling 1 inch apart along the centre of the sheet. Lift the top edge of the strip and bring it down to meet the bottom, letting it fall loosely over the filling and lining up the edges. Using your fingers, gently press on the dough close to each mound to coax out any trapped air, and then press on the edges to seal completely.
  4. Using a fluted pastry wheel or a knife, trim the long, unfolded edge of the ravioli if you like. Then cut the pasta between the mounds to form individual ravioli. Transfer the ravioli to the prepared baking sheet in a single layer. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. You can cook the ravioli right away or cover and refrigerate for up to a day (you can also freeze them; see Make-Ahead Tip, below).

 

Cook & Serve The Ravioli:

  1. When ready to serve, bring a pot of well-salted water to a boil. Gently slide the ravioli (fresh or frozen) into the water and cook until tender, 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter along with 1/4 cup of the pasta cooking water in a skillet or saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk to emulsify and season to taste with kosher salt.
  3. Use a skimmer to remove the ravioli from the water as draining them in a colander can damage them. Serve the ravioli with the butter sauce, garnished with the hazelnuts.

 

Make-Ahead Tips:

  1. The dough can be refrigerated, wrapped in plastic, for up to 2 days before rolling and shaping the ravioli.
  2. The filling can be refrigerated, covered, for up to 2 days.
  3. The uncooked ravioli can be frozen for up to a month: freeze them uncovered on their tray until rock hard, then transfer to zip-top bags and return to the freezer. There’s no need to thaw them before cooking.

 

Previously On St Francis Today; Cooking With Conrad Gallagher

Homemade Lemon Tart

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Dishwashers the Unsung Heroes

Spicy Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce

Elegant Steamed Asparagus & Hollandaise Butter Sauce

Avocado Deviled Egg

Traditional Spanish Omelette – Garlic Aioli 

Tomato and Goat’s Cheese Pizza, with chorizo and rocket

Could This Be The Best Burger Of Your Life?

In wine, age matters – in both vineyard and bottle! 

Prawn Spaghetti Aglio Olio

 Beef Marrow Truffle Sauce

Salmon Rillette

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – The Evolution Of Food

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – The Evolution Of Food

The Evolution of Food

by Conrad Gallagher

Conrad Gallagher is a Michelin Star chef and author and is the owner of Off The Menu Food Emporium and Bistro Vin De Boeuf in St Francis Bay. Furthermore, Conrad won his Michelin Star when he was only 24 years old. Thus we are very proud to have him writing for St Francis Today. Further, this is his regular column, Cooking With Conrad Gallagher.

The Evolution Of Food

In today’s column, Conrad chats about the evolution of food, and it is food for thought, literally.

Is everything we consume in some way or form, less natural than 50 odd years ago? How did we get here, and how do we go back?

Whilst doing thorough research and completely throwing myself into this article, I discovered something. Everything we’ve come to know starts with food. “Eat to live, don’t live to eat.”- Benjamin Franklin. However, there is something quite serene and captivating when sitting at one’s favourite restaurant, senses aroused with curiosity. The smell of freshly picked arugula lingering in the air, the white noise provided by people laughing, a coffee cup colliding with its saucer, soft lighting on a rainy day and finally, the warmth. Whether the warmth was provided by the amounts of champagne or the privilege of being able to sit serenely at the restaurant La Maison d’a Cote.

On that “champagne infused” note, let’s discuss food history and how it transformed humanity.

Back in the day, before we were classified as “Homo sapiens”, also Latin for “wise man”, we were classified as Homo erectus, which simply means upright man. This evolution was based entirely on how we prepare food. From catching it in the wild and tearing into the flesh of a hare with our teeth to preparing a slither of wolf on a controlled fire, picking on its tissue. However, someone somewhere discovered that there is, in fact, a more civilised manner in which to consume and prepare sustenance.

Suddenly there was a shift, and life as we know it stepped into formation. Our form shaped, we adapted fully to our surroundings. Moreover, the consistent consumption of meat resulted in the growth and expansion of our brains. This counteracted the size of our metabolism, which shrank immensely.

Wise, fit and advanced, we strutted through history.

Of course, food controls everything, along with fermented fruit and tobacco leaves. We were first-hand witnesses of this when the Covid-19 pandemic had its first outbreak at the beginning of 2020. Mankind spiralled out of control, buying produce in bulk, the illicit sale of alcohol and cigarettes, etc. Some humans preferred being paid in bread and beer and being buried with rations thereof to take into the afterlife. We got spoilt. The hunger for receiving and consuming food became a regular part of our day. Or, for some, the only important part of their day, gobbling down a pint of lumpy beer.

How did we get here? Ordering Burger King on Uber Eats. Documenting every meal we consume without even bothering that it’s getting cold because we simply have to get the right angle. We are turning into robotic humans. We live through social media. If there’s no dry ice on my sushi plate, why did I bother coming out in the first place? Just stop for a second and think. What am I putting in my body, and where did it come from? How much effort was put into this meal?

With that being said, there seemingly has been a change of some sort. The new generation has had an immense influence on the well-being of humans, animals, and the planet. For example, we started replacing regular milk with plant-based milk, healthier eco-friendly options, free-range options, etc. In addition, there is a newfound appreciation when it comes to fine dining, seeing each dish as a piece of art.

Organic simplicity is how we go back. Our generation wants to do good whilst looking good, and “eating clean & staying lean” is the ultimate motto for the 21st century.

We are “Homo sapiens”, and to provide an answer to the question asked at the very beginning of this blog, No, we are, in fact, more natural food-wise than we were 50 odd years ago. If there is one thing humans care more about than food in the 21st century, it is how and where we consume it. This is because we are obsessed with living life a certain way. And when living life a certain way can get snatched away from you at any second, as this pandemic has proven, there is an immense demand for appreciating life and food.

So how do we go back? I’m proud to announce that we’re already on our way.

That’s how the evolution of food led to the evolution of mankind, and it might just save it.

Previously On St Francis Today; Cooking With Conrad Gallagher

Homemade Lemon Tart

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Dishwashers the Unsung Heroes

Spicy Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce

Elegant Steamed Asparagus & Hollandaise Butter Sauce

Avocado Deviled Egg

Traditional Spanish Omelette – Garlic Aioli 

Tomato and Goat’s Cheese Pizza, with chorizo and rocket

Could This Be The Best Burger Of Your Life?

In wine, age matters – in both vineyard and bottle! 

Prawn Spaghetti Aglio Olio

 Beef Marrow Truffle Sauce

Salmon Rillette

Cooking With Conrad Gallagher – Butternut Ravioli with Sage Nut Brown Butter

Cooking With Conrad Gallagher – American Apple Pie

Nothing could be better than some genuine American apple pie. Conrad shows us how it’s done.

Ingredients:

Crust:

Flour – 2 1/2 cups

Sugar – 1 tbsp

Salt – ½ tsp

Baking Powder – ¼ tsp

Cold Butter – 2 sticks

(cut into tablespoon slices)

Very cold water – 4 to 6 tbsp

(I like to add a few ice cubes to a measuring cup with about a half cup of water…use that to pour into your measuring spoon)

Filling:

Apples – 3 pounds

(I used golden delicious, Granny Smith, and Jonagolds), peeled and each cut into 8 slices

Butter – 3 tbsp

Fresh Lemon Juice – 1 tbsp

Sugar – 2/3 cup

(you may use more or less depending on sweetness of apples)

Cinnamon – 1 tsp

Egg – 1

Dash of Salt

Method:

  1. Combine flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in a food processor and pulse a couple of times to mix. Add butter and pulse till the mixture looks like coarse cornmeal, about 20 short pulses. Sprinkle with 4 tablespoons of water and pulse about 5 times or until the dough starts to come together.
  2. Squeeze a small amount of dough between your fingers. If it doesn’t hold together add up to 2 more tablespoons of water, pulsing after each addition until the dough holds together. Recheck dough after each addition till it holds together.
  3. Put half of the dough on a piece of plastic wrap and form into a disk. Wrap completely and repeat with the other half. Refrigerate disks at least an hour before rolling.
  4. Melt butter in a large saute pan. Saute apples for about a minute, gently stirring to coat apples with butter. Add lemon juice and sugar and cook until the apples are just tender about 5 more minutes. Sprinkle with cinnamon and mix to combine. Allow to cool while rolling out the bottom crust.
  5. Preheat oven to 400º.
  6. Place the bottom crust into a 9-inch pie plate. Fill with apples. Roll out the top crust and place over apples. Seal edges and flute if desired. Cut a few vents into the top crust to allow steam to escape. Alternatively, you can cut the top crust into slits and weave to make a lattice crust.

Previously On St Francis Today; Cooking With Conrad Gallagher

Fettuccini Pasta

Homemade Lemon Tart

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Dishwashers the Unsung Heroes

Spicy Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce

Elegant Steamed Asparagus & Hollandaise Butter Sauce

Avocado Deviled Egg

Traditional Spanish Omelette – Garlic Aioli 

Tomato and Goat’s Cheese Pizza, with chorizo and rocket

Could This Be The Best Burger Of Your Life?

In wine, age matters – in both vineyard and bottle! 

Prawn Spaghetti Aglio Olio

 Beef Marrow Truffle Sauce

Salmon Rillette

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – Fettuccini Pasta

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – Fettuccini Pasta

Fettuccine pasta, literally little ribbons in Italian, is pasta popular in Roman and Tuscan cuisine. It is a flat, thick pasta traditionally made of egg and flour (usually one egg for every 100 g of flour), narrower than, but like, the tagliatelle typical of Bologna. Spinach fettuccine pasta is made from spinach, flour, and eggs.

Fettuccine pasta is often classically eaten with beef ragù or chicken ragù. Dishes made with fettuccine include fettuccine Alfredo, which evolved in the mid-20th century. Fettuccine is traditionally made fresh (either at home or commercially), but dried fettuccine can also be bought in stores.

Ingredients

200gm Fettuccine Pasta

 30gm Porcini Mushrooms

 50ml Heavy Cooking Cream

 20ml Demi-Glace Sauce

 1 Glove Garlic

 1 Chopped Shallot

 1 Pinch Fresh Thyme

 10ml Olive Oil

 10gm Shaved Parmesan

 Salt

 Pepper

Methods

  1. In a nonstick pan over high heat, place the olive oil, chopped shallots, garlic and thyme, and saute all ingredients for about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the porcini mushroom deglaze with the demi-glace sauce, heavy cooking cream, and salt and pepper. Reduce the sauce to half until a creamy smooth sauce.
  3. Bring water to boil with a pinch of salt and add the fettuccine pasta. Cook for about 8 minutes for al dente.
  4. Take the pasta from the water directly to the saucepan. Mix all together on a serving plate and add the shaved parmesan.

 Fettuccini Pasta

Previously On St Francis Today; Cooking With Conrad Gallagher

Homemade Lemon Tart

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Dishwashers the Unsung Heroes

Spicy Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce

Elegant Steamed Asparagus & Hollandaise Butter Sauce

Avocado Deviled Egg

Traditional Spanish Omelette – Garlic Aioli 

Tomato and Goat’s Cheese Pizza, with chorizo and rocket

Could This Be The Best Burger Of Your Life?

In wine, age matters – in both vineyard and bottle! 

Prawn Spaghetti Aglio Olio

 Beef Marrow Truffle Sauce

Salmon Rillette

 

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – Homemade Lemon Tart

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher – Homemade Lemon Tart

Home Made Lemon Tart

A lemon tart is a dessert dish, a variety of tart. It has a pastry shell with a lemon flavoured filling giving it a tangy zing. In the US, a lemon tart is often served with ice cream or whipped cream (often made in a fluted tart tin) containing a baked lemon custard (usually composed of eggs, sugar, lemon juice and cream). Usually, recipes include blind baking before adding the custard. Sometimes the tart is dusted with icing sugar before serving. Alternatively, the lemon filling can be cooked in a saucepan and added to the baked pastry case.

Ingredients

Buttery Crusty Pastry

2 cups cream

 1 cup sugar

 5 cups flour

 2 eggs

Lemon Curd

2 tsp light brown sugar

 4 tsp unsalted butter

 1 cup Crème Fraiche

 5 eggs

 4 eggs yolks

 Juice of 8 lemons

 1 cup sugar

 The rind of 5 lemons

Home Made Lemon Tart

Method to producing that home made lemon tart

  1. Preheat the oven to 120 deg f. In a mixing bowl, add the flour and the sugar, mix together for 3 minutes at low speed, add the eggs, mix through, add the cream, mix through. Once the dough is formed, remove it from the mixing bowl, form by hand and allow to rest for 20 minutes.
  2. Roll out the pastry as thinly as possible to line 4 flan rings with a removable base.
  3.  Line the pastry with parchment paper and fill with rice or dried beans,
  4.  Chill for 30 minutes. Bake blind for 10 minutes. Carefully remove the beans and parchment paper. Sprinkle the pastry case with light brown sugar and return to the oven for 5 minutes or until it is a pale golden colour and has quite a dry feel.
  5. Heat together the butter and Crème Fraiche in a bain-marie. Stir continuously until the mixture is smooth and warm. Set aside.

In A Separate Bowl…

  1. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg and yolks. Place this bowl in the bain-marie and continue whisking while adding the crème Fraiche mixture. When this is well combined, add the lemon juice. Mix well, and then strain through a fine sieve into a bowl. Place the bowl in the bain-marie. Add the sugar and lemon rind and continue to whisk until the mixture is quite frothy on the surface. At this stage, stop whisking and stir gently with a wooden spoon for about 5 minutes until the foam starts to disappear.
  2. Pour the filling into the tart or individual tarts. Bake for approximately 120 minutes at 80 degrees F until the filling starts to set. Turn the oven off and allow to set in the oven for a further 10-20 minutes. Allow the tart to cool thoroughly. Once cooled, cover the top with maple crystals and burn gently with a blow troche.

To Upgrade

Add citrus confit or serve with chilled raspberries or some citrus Crème Fraiche or pipe Italian meringue on top before gentle toasting in the oven to colour.

Who Is Conrad Gallagher? See more about the famous chef here – What I Do

Previously On St Francis Today, Cooking With Conrad Gallagher

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Dishwashers the Unsung Heroes

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher

Cooking with Conrad Gallagher

The Classic Steakhouse Burger

Who doesn’t love a big, tender, juicy steakhouse burger? They’re difficult to replicate at home because most steakhouses blend different cuts of beef — like sirloin, chuck, and short ribs — to customize the flavour and fat content of their burgers. It’s possible to grind your meat or ask your butcher for a unique blend, but it’s not always practical. Fortunately, there’s an easier way. By combining excellent quality ground beef with a mixture of bread and cream — and lots of seasoning, you can make steakhouse-style burgers in no time.

HOW TO MAKE A CLASSIC STEAKHOUSE BURGER

Begin by making the panade. Mash the bread and cream together with a fork until it forms a chunky paste.

Add the seasoning: salt, pepper, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, and ketchup.

Stir well

Add the ground beef and scallions

Mix everything until just combined.

Divide the mixture into eight equal portions and shape it into balls. Flatten each ball into a 3/4-inch-thick patty about 4-1/2 inches across. (Keeping the burgers thick ensures a nice char on the outside without overcooking the inside.) To prevent the burgers from forming a domed shape on the grill, create a slight depression in the center of each patty.

Grill the burgers for 2-4 minutes on the first side until nicely browned. Flip and cook on the second side for a few minutes more until done to your liking. (Note: the panade in these burgers keeps the meat tender and juicy.)

The Classic Steakhouse Burger Patty

These are the ultimate steakhouse burgers. They are packed with flavour and reliably juicy, even when cooked well-done.

Ingredients:

White Sandwich Bread – 2 Pieces

(Crusts Removed And Cut Into 1/4-Inch Pieces)

Cream – 1/3 Cup

Kosher Salt – 2 1/2 tsp

Freshly Ground Black Pepper – 1 tsp

Garlic Cloves, Minced – 3

Worcestershire Sauce – 1 1/2 tbsp

Ketchup – 2 tbsp

85% Lean Ground Beef – 3 pounds

Scallions, Very Finely Sliced (Optional) – 3

Hamburger Buns – 8

Method:

  1. Preheat the grill to high heat.
  2. In a large bowl, mash the bread and milk together with a fork until it forms a chunky paste.
  3. Add the salt, pepper, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, and ketchup and mix well.
  4. Add the ground beef and scallions and break the meat up with your hands.
  5. Mix everything until just combined.
  6. Divide the mixture into eight equal portions and form balls.
  7. Flatten the balls into 3/4-inch patties about 4-1/2 inches across.
  8. Form a slight depression in the center of each patty to prevent the burgers from puffing up on the grill.
  9. Oil the grilling grates.
  10. Grill the burgers, covered, until nicely browned on the first side, 2 to 4 minutes.
  11. Flip burgers and continue cooking for a few minutes more until done to your liking.
  12. Before serving, toast the buns on the cooler side of the grill if desired.
  13. Servings: 8